Beyond tropical

Welcome to the Trendenz Special Contributors feature. Every now and then we bring you inside stories and reports from journalists around the world. Our first contributor is Brazilian journalist and writer Vanessa Barone who gives us a particular and informed vision on the most recent São Paulo Fashion Week and Brazilian Fashion.

 

Alexandre Herchcovitch | Photo: Agência Fotosite

Alexandre Herchcovitch | Photo: Agência Fotosite

São Paulo Fashion Week, the biggest in Latin America, is now over. Looking back at all the shows and the designs for the summer 2014 a question remains: when will Brazilian designers cease to blindly follow what the designers from luxury brands come up with? The most recent edition of this Brazilian fashion week did lack prominent designers like Reinaldo Lourenço, Gloria Coelho and Clô Orozco (from Huis Clos *) and gave us a show of imported trends slightly adapted to the Brazilian climate and consumer profile. The need to follow the pace of international catwalks is perfectly understandable. But having an event like São Paulo Fashion Week (SPFW) repeating what international fashion has already launched does not seem reasonable. Now on its 35th edition, we hope this event and Brazilian designers address this issue.

Prints were all over, particularly stripes, in  shows by Alexandre Herchcovitch, Colcci, Osklen and Têca, just to  name a few. But these very same stripes are there in the most recent campaigns by Oscar de La Renta and Marc Jacobs, and in the bags by Michael Kors – after having been spotted at the Spring 2013 show by Dolce & Gabbana.

Alexandre Herchcovitch

Alexandre Herchcovitch | Photo: Agência Fotosite

Combination between black and white – an undeniable classic in fashion – was recently revisited by Balenciaga in its Spring 2013 collection. This trend is particularly strong and deserves a full editorial in the April issue of American Vogue. In this event Black and White was explored by brands such as UMA, Têca, Juliana Jabour and Tufi Duek. This colour combination often comes back in fashion and the fact that it was adopted by Brazilian designers precisely now is no coincidence.

It was difficult to define what will be “the colour of summer”. Red, orange and shades of green were some of the strongest bets. But the unanimous colour was white, which was there in the full looks by Colcci, Cori, UMA, Tufi Duek and Têca.

Osklen

Osklen | Photo: Agência Fotosite

Regarding cuts and shapes, the prevailing combination was between high waist trousers or skirts with short tops unveiling the belly, a trend already presented by Balenciaga, by the way. This combination was replicated here by brands such as Colcci, Osklen, Neon and Alexandre Herchcovitch. This is pretty much a Carmen Miranda style, suited certainly for few – and good- occasions.

Men’s fashion was not much represented in the event. João Pimenta was the only designer showing items just for them. Colcci and Osklen did also presented designs for men, but in mixed shows. From what we could see, the season promises to be less well behaved – something which was visible among European designer brands. In the Old Continent traditional brands have shown men wearing suits with shorts trousers– or even, shorts. In Brazil, this trend is not here yet, not even in hotter days.

Osklen

Osklen | Photo: Agência Fotosite

Beach fashion was not much represented in this edition of SPFW.  But from what we could see at the shows by Água de Coco, “tropical” themes still nurture the imagination of designers working in this segment. As to the shapes, democracy still rules – with thongs for those who prefer tiny beachwear items and hot pants for those who privilege comfort. One-piece swimsuits are still and big trend and they come in super elaborated designs. In this respect Brazilian fashion does seem to have sought inspiration in itself.

044MID_ Clo Orozco

Clo Orozco | Photo: Divulgação

* Nearly a week after this edition of São Paulo Fashion Week Brazilian fashion lost one of its biggest icons. Clô Orozco, founder of the brands Huis Clos and Maria Garcia was found dead on March 28 in the garden of the building where she lived in São Paulo. She worked 35 years in fashion and was one of the biggest designers Brazil has ever seen. She didn’t like the obvious and she never copied international trends. She wanted to make clothes for strong, independent and self-assured women and for that she created clothes with geometrical lines and sophisticated fabrics.  

By Vanessa Barone, reporting from São Paulo

 

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